How to polish brass and silver-The Quick & Easy Way To Clean Silver, Brass & Copper -

This is a easy way to electrochemically clean up brass, bronze and silver items that are badly tarnished. Brass, bronze and silver tarnish because the metal reacts with compounds in the surroundings. This can be oxygen, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds or chlorides. The tarnishing actually preserves the metal below by sealing it in, so it can not react further with the surroundings. This is the effect that protects statues, and roof cladding that are exposed to the elements for centuries.

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

By schouw Follow. Keep the routine cleaning of silver items part of your standard cleaning and make time to regularly deep clean your items. I am planning to nickle plate it, but I have to get it clean first. Extreem teen until warm, then apply as above. Reply Upvote. Plus do you ever really get the result you expect from Braso? Enter Your Log In Credentials. To help the reaction run, we add salts as reactants, and use hot water to polisj things up. I cleaned up a large bronze bilge pump some years ago, and it required a lot of work as there was a How to polish brass and silver of oil Formatting a previously partitioned hard drive it that helped preserve the tarnish.

Silvia saint gives footjob. Step 2: Start the Magic

Cover the entire surface in this manner. At this point, the brass should appear fairly polished. Apply even pressure in small, circular passes to give the brass an extra buffing. Stir the ingredients together in a plastic or glass bowl until smooth and thoroughly combined. How to polish brass and silver cloth has an outer layer of soft flannelet and an inner layer of flannel with bits of hematite embedded into it. For best results, rub the ketchup on in a single direction instead of rubbing it on in a back-and-forth motion anv a circular motion. You can do so by holding a magnet up to the object. Use a spoon or your fingers to apply the paste in a thick, even coat onto all sides of the brass surface. A little can go a long way, so you do not need to use much. Combine acidic lemon juice with a mild lolish. Go back to Dildoe distraction fuck menu.

Wondering how to clean brass in a variety of old-fashioned ways, from ketchup to toothpaste?

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The modern household probably has less of these materials than traditional households but some very nice family heirlooms or special trinkets are typically found within the home and it is these items that tend to get neglected without realising, then one day it dawns on you how deteriorated, old and forgotten that special item now looks.

Silver items can be of high value or have significant sentimental value, so when cleaning them be it routinely or deep cleaning you need to be careful, but a good thorough clean can rejuvenate a silver item beyond belief but routine cleaning should be completed regularly. Regular routine cleaning should be carried out by simply dusting and polishing with a microfibre cloth.

Polish is not good for silver and can cause the precious metal to taint over time and with regular use. Keep the routine cleaning of silver items part of your standard cleaning and make time to regularly deep clean your items. To clean silver first mix water and baking soda in a bowl to create a paste, mixing well to ensure a thick paste consistency.

Then using a soft cloth spread the paste over the silver liberally, ensuring to cover as much of the surface as possible. Once fully coated use a small section of the cloth and apply pressure, rubbing the mixture over the surface until it reveals the original bright shine of the silver surface. Once the dark areas of the silver have disappeared you can rinse the silver under the tap and use a clean cloth to remove all the excess cleaner, revealing a bright and shiny silver item.

I know of many people who have some small brass ornaments or have brass buckles on a belt for example and they are never happy with the shine. If you want to shine your belt buckle do you really want to go out and buy a bottle of Braso? Plus do you ever really get the result you expect from Braso? This is a quick and easy trick using ingredients which you will more than likely already have in the kitchen, simply follow the steps below as a regular deep clean of your brass items.

First squeeze lemon juice directly onto a clean sponge, then sprinkle a fine grain salt over the top of the lemon on the sponge, then rub over the brass swiftly, ensuring to cover the full area of the brass, once fully coated apply some pressure and rub the area completely until a bright shine is restored to the surface. Once you are happy the original shine is restored to the surface rinse the item under the tap and dry off with a clean cloth to reveal the bright shine of the original brass.

Copper is not as commonly used within the household as a decorative item but there are some and we do see many in commercial properties such as a traditional pub. Copper can be an unappreciated metal, it is used for our water pipes after all but, when maintained well it can be a very beautiful metal, but cleaning should be carried out properly.

As with most metals whether considered precious or not, general cleaning should be completed using a simple clean microfibre cloth but daylight can deteriorate the appearance of copper, dulling the rich colour to make it look closer to a dull bras than the original deep colour.

Pour over some fine grain salt to add a little texture and then spread over the brass liberaly. No Comments.

Thank you for your feedback. Categories: Cleaning Brass. Use a dry, soft cloth to dry off any remaining moisture while giving the brass a final shine. Get fast, free delivery with Amazon Prime. Tips Avoid touching brass as much as possible.

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver. 1. Assess the piece’s condition

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Brasso Multi-Purpose Metal Polish, 8 oz. Go back to filtering menu. Tell us how we can improve If you need help, please visit the help section or contact us. Submit Please provide a response. Response must be less that , characters. Thank you for your feedback. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Learn more about Amazon Prime.

Get fast, free delivery with Amazon Prime. Back to top. You'll need to let the polish paste sit on the brass for a prolonged period of time, so you should arrange the brass items in need of polishing on a plastic or glass platter and in a single layer.

If you decide to use a metal baking sheet, line it with a layer of parchment paper or wax paper first to avoid letting the brass and the paste come into direct contact with the metal sheet. Apply the paste and let it sit. Use a spoon or your fingers to apply the paste in a thick, even coat onto all sides of the brass surface. Allow the paste to sit on the brass for at least 1 to 2 hours, if not longer.

For severely tarnished or dulled brass, you can even leave the paste on overnight. As the vinegar paste does its thing, you should see it take on a green tint. This green tint is a natural result produced by the chemical action taking place, and it means that the tarnish and surface debris being dissolved and removed.

Wash off the dried paste. When the brass is ready, gently scrub the paste off with a soft cloth and lukewarm running water. Gently buff the surface of the brass using small circular motions as you rinse. Scrub the surface of the brass thoroughly to make sure that all the paste has been removed. Depending on how thick your paste ended up being, it could take a bit of scraping with your thumbnail to chip it away. Buff with a dry cloth. To dry the brass and give it a final boost of shine, buff it with a soft, dry cloth using small circular passes until you cover the entire surface.

Method 4. Squirt a dollop of ketchup onto a soft cloth. A lot can go a long way, so you only need about 1 to 2 tsp 5 to10 ml of ketchup, at most. Tomato juice is a mild acid, so the use of tomato-based products can help dissolve debris causing tarnish and dullness on your brass. Ketchup is your best option since it is so thick, but in the absence of ketchup, you could also try tomato paste or tomato juice.

Rub the surface of the brass with the ketchup. Wipe the sides of the brass object down with the ketchup-covered cloth, coating all sides in the ketchup. For best results, rub the ketchup on in a single direction instead of rubbing it on in a back-and-forth motion or a circular motion.

Wipe off the residue. Use a damp cloth to wipe off the ketchup after allowing the tomato substance to sit on the surface for a couple of minutes. You could also rinse the brass under running water to get the ketchup off, but using a damp cloth provides the added benefit of a little extra buffing. Buff until dry and shiny. Use a dry, soft cloth to dry off any remaining moisture while giving the brass a final shine. Thoroughly buff the entire surface by passing over it in small, circular motions.

Method 5. Combine acidic lemon juice with a mild abrasive. The most common abrasives including baking soda and cream of tartar. Alternatively, you could also use half of a lemon and a little salt. Combine 1 to 2 Tbsp 15 to 30 ml of lemon juice with 1 to 2 tsp 5 to 10 ml of baking soda.

The mixture should fizz at first, but gradually calm down once you stir it together. If using lemon and salt, cut a lemon in half and remove the seeds from one half. Coat the cut surface with table salt until well-coated. Apply the lemon juice to the brass. Use a soft cloth or your fingers to wipe the lemon paste onto the surface of the brass, coating it completely. Rub the paste on in a single direction for best results. A lemon-and-baking-soda paste only needs to sit for a few minutes, but a lemon-and-cream-of-tartar paste should sit on the brass for about 30 minutes.

If going the lemon-and-salt route, rub the salt-covered lemon half over the entire surface of the brass. Apply more salt to the lemon as needed until the entire brass surface has been polished. Rinse off the residue.

Place the brass under lukewarm running water and gently wipe the residue away with your fingers. If parts of the brass still seem dull, you can reapply the lemon solution of choice to that area for additional shine.

Dry and buff with a soft cloth. Wipe the brass dry with a soft, clean towel. Apply even pressure in small, circular passes to give the brass an extra buffing. Once I polish the brass and re-lacquer, how do I make it shine? My brass lamp is dull after the re-lacquering.

You have to make the brass shiny before you apply any lacquer. There is no way to polish it when it has lacquer on top. Other than that, wet sanding is commonly used to clear up the coat. Yes No. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 4. They could, but I would suggest reading through wikiHow's article on cleaning brass instruments instead. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 2. I used corn starch instead of flour. Will I still get results?

How long should I leave the paste on? My brass item turned a pinkish color. Fire Wraith. Go to a professional instrument repair shop. These DIY things don't work all the time and could harm your poor instrument if you do them incorrectly. You either stained your poor baby or gave it red rot.

Not Helpful 1 Helpful 2. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Already answered Not a question Bad question Other. Article Summary X To polish brass with a commercial polish, start by squeezing a dollop of the polish onto a soft, clean, cotton cloth or terry rag.

Did this summary help you? Tips Avoid touching brass as much as possible. The oils from your skin can cause the brass to tarnish and dull quicker.

This is a easy way to electrochemically clean up brass, bronze and silver items that are badly tarnished. Brass, bronze and silver tarnish because the metal reacts with compounds in the surroundings. This can be oxygen, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds or chlorides.

The tarnishing actually preserves the metal below by sealing it in, so it can not react further with the surroundings. This is the effect that protects statues, and roof cladding that are exposed to the elements for centuries. Sometimes, however, we wish to remove this tarnishing, like in the example of the bronze handle pictured here. One way to remove tarnishing is to use abrasives like sand paper or polishing creams.

Any such mechanical polishing removes some of the metal every time you do it. This can be seen on old silverware, where the patterns and engravings are usually rounded and have lost detail. The electrochemical way of removing tarnishing, that we use here, is gentler in this respect. In short terms it turns the surface metal back to its original state by removing only the compounds that reacted with it in the first place. This is a good way to clean up detailed items, where mechanical polishing could cause damage.

It could also save you a lot of polishing work if the metal is badly tarnished. The simple theory behind this method is that different chemicals have different affinities toward each other. Aluminum has a higher affinity for the sulphur, oxygen and chlorides mentioned above than brass, bronze or silver does, so when you put them in contact with each other, the atoms are going to recombine.

In the end, you get tarnished aluminum, while the tarnish is removed from the brass, bronze or silver you started with. Be aware that this method removes all of the tarnish on your items, so on silver, you will also loose the tarnishing in the deeper parts of patterns and engravings. Most of you have probably tried cleaning copper coins in ketchup or cola at some point in your life. This is a different type of reaction. In both cases the oxidised metal will react with the acid.

For household use this is usually acetic acid vinegar citric acid lemon juice or tartaric acid. This is a very efficient way to remove tarnish, but similar to polishing, it removes metal and should be used with care on delicate objects.

Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. Use a container that is not made of metal. This is to ensure that your items don't react with the container.

Glass, plastic, porcelain or enamelled containers are super. Put the item you want to clean on the foil. The metals need to be in direct contact for this to work. For larger items, like this handle, pack the foil around it, so you get a larger contact surface. Mix baking soda and salt with hot water and cover everything with it.

The proportions are not crucial, but about 1 tablespoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of baking soda to 3 dl water should do the trick. Lightly tarnished objects should clean up in a few minutes, and you just rinse them of and dry them. For more heavily tarnished objects, you just have to give it some time. You will see tiny gass bubbles rising from the metal as an indicator that the magic is happening.

Now, the bronze handle I have used here is an extreme case. It has probably been laying on the sea floor for decades, and in addition to the tarnishing, it is encrusted in the carbonate shells of marine organisms and other forms of grime.

This kind of cleanup requires some extra juice. The vinegar serves two purposes in this case. The first is that it dissolves the carbonate shells formed by different creatures over the years. The second is that it removes some of the tarnishing by reacting with the metal.

In a solid object such as this, I'm not worried about the tiny amount of metal removed by this process. Even this heavily tarnished and encrusted handle only needed three hours in the mixture to clean up completely.

As you can see in the third picture, it looks pretty much the same upon removal from the bath. The difference is that the grime no longer sticks to the metal.

On the forth picture I have simply rubbed the grime of under running water with my fingers, and on the last picture, I have removed the last of it with a scrubbing sponge to reveal a nice and shiny bronze handle. This method does not leave you with a shiny surface in the end. To achieve that, you have to do some final polishing.

Participated in the Trash to Treasure Contest Doesnt that simply give a neutral mix again? Question 1 year ago on Step 2. I have an old ships steering wheel that I picked up from the sea bed that is very badly tarnished. Is there a paste I can make to put on the brass parts? I also have brass port and starboard lanterns that are in need of serious cleaning.

Answer 1 year ago. If this is an old steering wheel that has been in seawater for some time, I would consider seeking professional help in conserving it, and keep it in freshwater in the meantime. Crystalising salt can utterly destroy wood that has been submerged for a while. Another thing that tends to happen with submerged brass is that the zinc gets washed out of the alloy, leaving it brittle.

Worst case, this makes it brake apart. Best case, it just pits the surface. I have cleaned up some badly tarnished items by applying a paste of vinegar, salt and flour. Wash of the paste after a while, and reapply as needed.

This is not the electrochemical reaction described above though, just the acid removing the tarnished metal. I bought this ring in at the Spokane Worlds Fair. You can tell its age by the hippie-dippie shape of the letters. I haven't been able to wear it because it's brass and it turns my finger green. I am planning to nickle plate it, but I have to get it clean first.

I've got a bit more work to do…. Reply 2 years ago. Great article! I attach a photo of a brass bell. It's about 9" round. Should I use your method? No picture visible here. As mentioned, the electrochemical method is very gentle, so it will not harm the bell.

Are you certain there is nothing on the bell that prevents the vinegar from working? I cleaned up a large bronze bilge pump some years ago, and it required a lot of work as there was a lot of oil on it that helped preserve the tarnish. The tartaric acid option also removes some of the metal from the item you are cleaning, so for finer details it might not be the best option.

For a high polish use something like Brasso or any proprietary metal polish and cardboard - ideally corrugated box stuff. It is very slightly abrasive and gives a deep shine, without excessive wearing. By schouw Follow. More by the author:. About: I'm a biologist interested in all things sciency.

I love to figure out how things work and to make my own stuff, be it food, woodworking, electronics or sewing. I have used it quite a bit to clean up boat hardware and items I have picked up while diving. The method is simple, and leaves you with a nice clean item without having to do much work. To help the reaction run, we add salts as reactants, and use hot water to speed things up.

Add Teacher Note. Crumple up som aluminum foil and put it in your container. In this case, I also added some vinegar and a little dishwashing soap to the water. The dishwashing soap is just there to help remove residues of oils. Instead of hours of polishing, this required less than five minutes of actual work to clean up. Did you make this project?

Share it with us! I Made It! Reply Upvote. Answer Upvote. WrshpMzshn 2 years ago. Your instructable really helped.

How to polish brass and silver

How to polish brass and silver